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Bible

Bible 700

Bible 700 provides a developmental and in-depth academic study of the teachings of the Old and New Testaments. It focuses on worship, mankind, the attributes of God, prophecies about Christ, the living of balanced lives, and the book of Psalms. Special emphasis is given to the life of Christ from His pre-existence and birth to His resurrection and ascension. These areas target five content strands: theology, the attributes of God, biblical literature, Christian growth, and the life of Christ (a special topic).

 

Bible 800

Bible 800 provides a developmental and in-depth academic study of the teachings of the Old and New Testaments. It focuses on prayer, salvation, the attributes of God, the book of Proverbs, and interpersonal relationships. Special emphasis is given to a survey of Church history from the early Church through the Reformation. These areas target five content strands: theology, the attributes of God, biblical literature, Christian growth, and Church history (a special topic).

 

New Testament Survey

New Testament Survey provides a developmental and in-depth academic study of the teachings of the New Testament from the intertestamental period (prior to the birth of Christ) to the book of Revelation. The survey emphasizes the most important people, places, and events in the development and expansion of the Church. The course also includes material on Christian suffering, witnessing, and the will of God. New Testament Survey targets four major strands: theology, biblical literature, biblical background, and Christian growth.

 

Old Testament Survey

Old Testament Survey provides a developmental and in-depth academic study of the teachings of the Old Testament, from the creation of the world (Genesis) to the restoration of Israel and the ministry of its post-exilic prophets (Malachi). The survey emphasizes the most important people, places, and events in the development and decline of the nation of Israel. These areas target three content strands: theology, biblical literature, and biblical background.

 

Bible Doctrine

Bible Doctrine provides a developmental and in-depth academic study of the teachings of the Old and New Testaments, focusing on important topics including the faithfulness of God; the doctrine of Christ; the nation of Israel; the history and integrity of the Bible; the pursuit of happiness; and friendship, dating, and marriage. There is also a special emphasis on the book of Romans. These areas target four content strands: theology, the attributes of God, Christian growth, and Christian evidences.

 

Christian Faith and Living

Christian Faith and Living applies what students have learned in their study of the teachings of the Old and New Testaments. The course focuses on personal Christian ministry, the nature of God, comparative religions, and the writings of James, John, David, Solomon, and Daniel. These areas target three content strands: the attributes of God, biblical literature, and Christian growth.

 

History and Geography

 

History and Geography 700

History and Geography 700 continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. The course surveys the social sciences, covering history, geography, anthropology, sociology, economics, and political science. These areas of focus target all five major content strands: History, Geography, Government and Citizenship, Economics, and Social Studies Skills.

 

History and Geography 800

History and Geography 800 continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. The course focuses on American History, covering the subject from early exploration through the present day, with special emphasis given to the Civil War and to inventions and technology of the 19th and early 20th centuries. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Geography, and Government and Citizenship.

 

 

World Geography

World Geography takes students on a journey around the world in which they will learn about the physical and human geography of various regions. They will study the history of each region and examine the political, economic, and cultural characteristics of the world in which we live. Students will also learn about the tools and technologies of geography such as globes, maps, charts, and global information systems.

 

World History

World History continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. With an emphasis on Western Europe, the course surveys ancient civilizations to the end of the 20th century, highlighting early Christianity (through the Reformation) and the two World Wars. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Geography, and Social Studies Skills.

 

American History

American History continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. The course covers early American exploration to the present day, placing special emphasis on the politics of the 18th and early 19th centuries and the Civil War. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Geography, and Government and Citizenship.

 

 

Government and Economics

Government and Economics continues the process of developing in students an understanding of and appreciation for God’s activity as seen in the record of man and his relationships. The course focuses on two major areas:

Government, with special emphasis on American government, and Economics, with special emphasis on personal finance. These areas of focus target three major content strands: History, Government and Citizenship, and Economics.

 

English Language Arts

 

Language Arts 700

Language Arts 700 continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

* Reading–develops students’ reading skills, including the identification of main ideas, supporting  details, and sequence; teaches students how to reach logical conclusions as well as use appropriate reading rates; shows students how to identify parts of speech in sentences, with emphasis on adjectives, adverbs, conjunctions, pronouns, and verb types; helps students develop basic literary comprehension skills through the reading of biographical and autobiographical pieces, poetry, and character analyses.

* Writing–develops students’ understanding of sentence structure, providing hands-on experience with coordination, conjunctions, subject-verb agreement, participles, and phrases; familiarizes students with roots, affixes, and basic word relationships, including homonyms, synonyms, and antonyms; develops students’ vocabulary and spelling skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing paragraphs, character analyses, character sketches, short biographies, and summaries; develops students’ critical thinking skills through speculative writing on morality.

* Speaking–teaches skills that enable students to become effective speakers and communicators, weaving the skills together throughout the course.

* Listening–teaches effective listening comprehension skills, weaving these together throughout the lessons; builds upon students' study skills.

 

Language Arts 800

Language Arts 800 continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

* Reading–reinforces reading comprehension skills by teaching students how to analyze propaganda and other forms of writing, including biographies, autobiographies, formal essays, and informal essays; shows students how to make denotative, symbolic, and connotative readings of a text; introduces both Old English and Middle English languages and literature to develop students' understanding of English language formation and development; prepares students for the higher level literary comprehension skills required in the upper grades.

* Writing–develops students' understanding of sentence structure, providing hands-on experience with conjunctions, transitions, clauses, and common sentence errors; teaches language histories and etymologies to help students build on knowledge of word structures, including topics like prefixes, roots, and suffixes; expands on students' vocabulary and spelling skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing business letters, friendly letters, informal essays, and basic literature analyses.

* Speaking–offers students experience in delivering oral reports; teaches skills that enable students to become effective speakers and communicators, weaving these skills together throughout the course.

* Listening–teaches effective listening comprehension skills, weaving these together throughout the lessons; builds upon students' study skills, as well as helping them become reliable and efficient note takers.

 

English I

English I continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

* Reading–reinforces reading comprehension skills by teaching students how to understand and  appreciate poetry, drama, informative nonfiction, and fiction; shows students how to analyze, evaluate, and interpret a text; reinforces awareness of the elements and structure of narrative prose; guides students through readings of drama, a novel, and selections from well-known poetry, and short stories.

* Writing–furthers students’ understanding of sentence structures; reviews parts of speech and their types, including in-depth studies on verbs (transitive, intransitive, conjugation, tense, voice, mood); develops students’ understanding of the types and functions of phrases and clauses; teaches language history and etymology to help students build on knowledge of word structures, including prefixes, roots, and suffixes; expands on students’ vocabulary skills; reviews spelling skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing speeches, short essays, poetry, friendly/business letters, and short stories.

* Speaking–offers students experience in delivering a speech; teaches skills that enable students to become effective speakers and communicators, weaving these skills together throughout the course.

* Listening–teaches effective listening comprehension skills, weaving these together throughout the lessons.

 

English II

English II continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

* Reading–reinforces reading comprehension skills by teaching students how to comprehend and appreciate poetry, drama, nonfiction, and fiction; shows students how to analyze, evaluate, and interpret a text; reinforces awareness of the elements and structure of narrative prose; guides students through readings of the allegory Everyman and Sheldon’s In His Steps, as well as selections of and excerpts from well-known poetry and short stories.

* Writing–develops students’ understanding of complex sentence and paragraph structures, providing hands on experience with connectives, transitions, phrases, and clauses; teaches language history and etymology to help students build on knowledge of grammar and word structures; expands on students’ vocabulary skills; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing a set of instructions, a literary critique, a poem, a short story, and a speech.

* Speaking–offers students experience in delivering a speech; teaches skills that enable students to become effective speakers and communicators, weaving the skills throughout the course.

* Listening–teaches effective listening comprehension skills, integrating these throughout the lessons.

* Special Topics–incorporates research skills, including internet, library, and reference material use, throughout the curriculum.

 

English III

English III continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

* Reading–reinforces reading comprehension skills by teaching students comprehension techniques for literary fiction, nonfiction, poetry, and drama; discusses common literary devices; shows students how to analyze, evaluate, and interpret a text; reinforces awareness of the elements and structure of narrative and expository prose; guides students through readings of Thornton Wilder’s Our Town (play) and Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird as well as selections of and excerpts from well-known poetry and nonfiction pieces.

* Writing–develops students’ writing skills by teaching about clauses and phrases in sentence structures; reviews common sentence construction errors and methods for avoiding them; provides practice in standard and nonstandard English, as well as specialized language use; teaches Greek and Latin roots and prefixes to enhance vocabulary and spelling skills; expands students’ abilities to write cohesive and coherent expository prose; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing literary critiques, personal essays, poetry, and research papers.

* Special Topics–incorporates research skills, including internet, library, and reference material use, throughout the curriculum.

 

English IV

English IV continues to build on the sequential development and integration of communication skills in four major areas—reading, writing, speaking, and listening. It most specifically focuses on deepening and furthering students' understanding in the following ways:

* Reading–reinforces reading comprehension skills by teaching students comprehension techniques for literary fiction, poetry, and drama, including discussion of common literary devices; shows students how to analyze, evaluate, and interpret a text; reinforces awareness of the elements and structure of narrative and expository prose; guides students through English literary history, including readings of Shakespeare’s Hamlet, Milton’s Paradise Lost, Beowulf, Bunyan’s The Pilgrim’s Progress, and other selections of and excerpts from major English literary figures.

* Writing–develops students’ writing skills by teaching about clauses and phrases in sentence structures; reviews common sentence and paragraph construction errors and methods for avoiding them; teaches Greek and Latin roots and prefixes to enhance vocabulary and spelling skills; expands students’ abilities to write cohesive and coherent expository prose; gives students the opportunity to develop their abilities in writing literary critiques, poetry, short stories, and expository prose.

* Listening–teaches effective listening comprehension skills, weaving these throughout the lessons; builds upon students' study skills as well as helps them to become reliable and efficient note takers.

* Special Topics- incorporates research skills, including internet, library, and reference material use, throughout the curriculum.

 

Math

 

Mathematics 700

Mathematics 700 is designed to prepare junior-high students for Pre-algebra. This course focuses on strengthening needed skills in problem solving, number sense, and proportional reasoning. It also introduces students to integers, equations, and geometric concepts. Students will begin to see the "big picture" of mathematics and learn how numeric, algebraic, and geometric concepts are woven together to build a foundation for higher mathematical thinking.

 

Mathematics 800

Pre-algebra is an introductory algebra course designed to prepare junior-high school students for Algebra I. The course focuses on strengthening needed skills in problem solving, integers, equations, and graphing. Students will begin to see the "big picture" of mathematics and learn how numeric, algebraic, and geometric concepts are woven together to build a foundation for higher mathematical thinking.

 

Algebra I

Algebra I – is a full year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic concepts covered in the prerequisite course, Pre-Algebra. Within the Algebra I course, the student will explore basic algebraic fundamentals such as evaluating, creating, solving and graphing linear, quadratic, and polynomial functions.

 

Geometry

Geometry is a full-year, high school math course for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course, Algebra I. The course focuses on the skills and methods of linear, quadratic, coordinate, and plane geometry.

In it, students will gain solid experience with geometric calculations and coordinate plane graphing, methods of formal proof, and techniques of construction.

 

Algebra II

Algebra II – is a full-year, high school math course intended for the student who has successfully completed the prerequisite course Algebra I. This course focuses on algebraic techniques and methods in order to develop student understanding of advanced number theory, concepts involving linear, quadratic and polynomial functions, and pre-calculus theories. This course also integrates geometric concepts and skills throughout the units, as well as introducing students to basic trigonometric identities and problem solving.

 

Pre-calculus

Pre-calculus is a full-year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered the core algebraic and conceptual geometric concepts covered in the prerequisite courses: Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The course primarily focuses on the skills and methods of analytic geometry and trigonometry while investigating further relationships in functions, probability, number theory, limits, and the introduction of derivatives.

 

Science

 

General Science I

General Science I is a basic intermediate course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in God’s physical universe. This course expands on the Science 600 course, providing a set of basic scientific skills and a broad survey of the major areas of science. Some of the areas covered in General Science I include the scientific method, overview of the four major areas of science, mathematics in science, astronomy, the atmosphere, natural cycles, weather and climate, human anatomy and physiology, and careers in science. The course seeks to develop the student’s ability to be aware of and participate in scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects to capitalize on the students’ natural curiosity. The student will explore, observe, and manipulate everyday objects and materials in their environment. Students at this level should show understanding of interrelationships between organisms, recognize patterns in systems, and expand their knowledge of cellular dimensions of living systems. Collectively, this should help students develop and build on their subject-matter knowledge base.

 

General Science II

General Science II is a basic intermediate course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in God’s physical universe. This course expands on the Science 600 and General Science I courses, providing a set of basic scientific skills and a broad survey of the major areas of science. Some of the areas covered in General Science II include the history of science, structure and properties of matter, health and nutrition, types of energy, electricity and magnetism, work, energy, forces, simple machines, balance in nature, natural cycles and resources. The course seeks to develop the student’s ability to be aware of and participate in scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects to capitalize on the students’ natural curiosity. The student will explore, observe, and manipulate everyday objects and materials in their environment. Students at this level should show understanding of interrelationships between organisms and the environment, recognize patterns in systems, and expand their knowledge of cellular dimensions of living systems. Collectively, this should help students develop and build on their subject-matter knowledge base.

 

Integrated Physics and Chemistry

Integrated Physics and Chemistry is a physical science course designed for high school students needing an entry level science course covering basic concepts found in chemistry and physics. Topics included in this study are:

* matter,

* motion and forces,

* work and energy,

* electricity and magnetism, and

* waves.

Throughout the course, students will have opportunities to observe simulations, investigate ideas, and solve problems–both on screen and away from the computer.

 

Biology

Biology is intended to expose students to the designs and patterns of living organisms that have been created by God. In preceding years, students should have developed a foundational understanding of life sciences. This biology course will expand upon that knowledge and incorporate more abstract knowledge. The student's understanding should encompass both the micro and macro aspects of life and this biology course includes both. The major concepts covered are taxonomy, the chemical basis of life, cellular structure and function, genetics, microbiology, botany, human anatomy and physiology, and ecological principles. Students at this level should show development in their ability and understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for the student and actively engage the student. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the student's skill and understanding.

Biology should be preceded or accompanied by an Algebra I course.

 

Chemistry

Chemistry is intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in the world that God has created. In preceding years, students should have developed an understanding for the macroscopic properties of substances and been introduced to the microstructure of substances. This chemistry course will expand upon that knowledge, further develop the microstructure of substances, and teach the symbolic and mathematical world of formulas, equations, and symbols. The major concepts covered are measurement, atomic structure, chemical formulas and bonding, chemical reactions, stoichiometry, gases, chemical equilibrium, and organic chemistry.

Students at this level should show development in their ability and understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for the student and actively engage the student. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the student’s skill and understanding.

Chemistry should be preceded by an Algebra I course and preceded or accompanied by an Algebra II course

 

Physics

Physics is intended to expose students to the design and order in the world that God has created. In preceding years, students should have developed a basic understanding of the macroscopic and microscopic world of forces, motion, waves, light, and electricity. The physics course will expand upon that prior knowledge and further develop both. The curriculum will also seek to teach the symbolic and mathematical world of formulas and symbols used in physics. The major concepts covered are kinematics, forces and motion, work and energy, sound and light waves, electricity and magnetism, and nuclear physics. Students at this level should show development in their ability and understanding of scientific inquiry. The units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop a deeper conceptual meaning for the student and actively engage the student. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the student’s skill and understanding.

Physics should be preceded by Algebra I and II courses and geometry.

 

Electives

 

American Literature

American Literature is a five-unit elective that engages high school students in a literary conversation with some of the most colorful and influential minds in American history. Their words will give students a greater understanding of themselves, their culture, and the ideas of others. The course teaches students the various movements in American literature, starting with the roots of American literature in writings from the Puritans. The course concludes with works by Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., and other black writers who were part of the struggle for racial freedom during the civil rights era.

 

British Literature

Beginning with works from the Middle Ages, British Literature is a five-unit course that teaches high school students about some of the greatest books of Western Civilization. Students will learn how to appreciate the English literature of the Middle Ages for its wisdom and beauty and will also gain a better understanding of the development of the English language and its literature. Course units cover one to two centuries, concluding with the writings of apologist C.S. Lewis in the 20th century.

 

Business Computer Information Systems

BCIS is a high school elective that explores the use of technology applications in both business and personal situations. The course provides key knowledge and skills in the following areas:

* communication skills

* business technology

* word processing applications

* spreadsheet applications

* database applications

* telecommunications technology

* desktop publishing technology

* presentation technology

* computer networks

* computer operating systems

 

Civics

In this five-section elective, high-school students will learn about the rights and responsibilities of being an American citizen. By studying different forms of government, students will investigate what motivated America's founding fathers as they drafted the U.S. Constitution. Students will also learn about the branches of the U.S. government as laid out in the Constitution and about the structure of state and local governments. In each unit, students will complete an in-depth project related to that unit's topic.

 

College Planner

College Planner is a one-semester high-school elective, with the following goals:

* guiding students in the entire college process

* planning for college

* selecting the right school

* the application process

* financial aid

* guiding students who may not be headed to college

   The program focuses on the decision-making process of choosing a school, covering both the

   application process and financial requirements. Additionally, for those students who will not be

   attending college or university, the course surveys non-college options.

Course Structure:

Each unit has its own theme.

Unit 1: My Educational Future

The first unit focuses on the big questions: What's God's will for my educational future? Why go to college?

Why choose a particular school?

Unit 2: Choosing A College

The two main themes of Unit 2 are calendars and lists.

* Calendars: This unit includes a series of planning calendars, identifying what a student should

   be doing during each year of high school in preparation for college.

* Lists: Unit 2 also helps a student identify several colleges that might be the right choice, and

   then narrow that long list down, identifying each college’s strengths.

Unit 3: Entrance Exams And Applications

The theme of Unit 3 is entrance exams and applications. It gives students an introduction to all major

entrance exams: the PSAT, the SAT I and SAT II, and the ACT. In addition, the application process is covered, including application essays.

Unit 4: Paying For College

The theme of Unit 4 is financial aid. In addition to explaining grants, loans, and scholarships, it covers these two questions: What Does College Really Cost? and How Much Will You Be Expected to Pay?

Unit 5: Non-College Options

Unit 5 focuses on non-college options, such as apprenticeships and internships. In addition, the military is considered as an option. These content areas are presented in a reading-based format, utilizing a combination of on- and off computer assignments and activities, with the power of SOS automation and administration.

 

Consumer Math

Consumer Math is an introduction to the many ways in which math can be used in everyday life. The course gives practical advice on how to handle situations that involve money and math principles. Consumer Math focuses on the basic skills and methods of arithmetic and provides students the opportunity to develop experience with algebraic techniques of evaluating variables and equations, including geometric formulas and interest equations. Students will also be introduced to topics in statistics.

 

The major areas of study in this course are as follows:

Number Skills

Number Skills lessons consist of basic math review. They emphasize non-algebra-related topics, such as

decimals, fractions, and percentages, topics that are typically covered before high school.

 

Statistics

Statistics lessons are fairly advanced, providing instruction on sets and probability; measures of variation and distribution (such as standard deviation and z-scores); accurate sampling and confidence intervals; data interpretation; and graph creation and interpretation.

 

Geometry

Geometry lessons teach about measurement, focusing on applying measurement in the

construction/building trades. These lessons cover ratio and proportion; perimeter, area, and volume of twoand three-dimensional figures (including pyramids, cones, cylinders, and spheres); and indirect measurement using similarity and right triangle relationships (including sine, cosine, and tangent).

 

Personal Finance

Consumer Math also offers instruction on personal finance, covering topics like job acquisition, payroll

deduction, commissions and tips, buying/leasing/renting goods and equipment, health insurance, asset

depreciation, vacation and travel costs, retirement, life insurance, and will and estate planning.

 

Taxes

Some lessons address the issue of taxes, discussing federal, state, and local taxes, and also FICA and

miscellaneous taxes.

 

Banks and Financial Instruments

Consumer Math explores the world of banks and financial instruments, covering topics like savings and

checking accounts; interest rates; stocks, bonds, and mutual funds; loan financing; credit cards; and

mortgages.

 

Digital Arts

Digital Arts is a semester-long elective designed to provide computer science students with an introduction to visualization-graphics programming on computers. To equip students for today’s digitally driven lifestyle, this course focuses on using a digital camera and the practical application of digital imaging and editing programs. Additionally, students will work with audio-editing programs, and will also examine 3D technology and cinematography.

Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.

 

Earth Science

Earth Science is a high school science course that explores Earth’s structure, interacting systems, and place in the universe. The course uncovers concepts and processes found in:

* astronomy – Earth’s place in and interaction with space,

* geology – physical structure and dynamic processes,

* meteorology – atmosphere, weather and climate, and

* oceanography – oceans and marine life.

Students will have the opportunity to evaluate and explore many scientific concepts by participating in interactive lab sessions, conducting hands-on activities, and completing projects designed to improve the understanding of Earth and its dynamic functions.

 

Essentials of Business

This semester-long course is an introduction to the goals, processes, and operations of business enterprises for students. The main focus is on the functions that a company – whether a multinational corporation or a corner grocery store – must manage effectively to be successful. These include accounting, finance, human resource management, marketing, operations management, and strategic planning. Attention is also given to the legal environment in which businesses operate, and the importance of business ethics and corporate citizenship. Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.

 

 

Essentials of Communication

Essentials of Communication: A Guide to Interacting Effectively in Today's World™ is a five-unit elective course for high school students. The materials cover fundamentals of the communication process important for successful interaction in a variety of social and professional settings. Students can use the course to gain and apply knowledge about communication theories, characteristics of language and language use, interpersonal relationships, group dynamics, and public speaking in order to interact more effectively with others.

 

Family and Consumer Science

Family and Consumer Science is a 10-unit elective that uses biblical principles to help high school students develop positive self-esteem and learn to successfully navigate relationships with family, friends, co-workers, and even those in the marketplace. The curriculum introduces students to character and appearance from a biblical perspective. The material also teaches about nutrition, clothing styles, home care and hospitality, personal finance, and child development and care.

 

Foundations for Living

Foundations for Living is an elective for high school students. Designed specifically with 11th and 12th graders in mind, Foundations for Living provides a Bible-based, sequential development of a Christian worldview through the use of fundamental truths from the Bible and the application of biblical principles to the various areas of contemporary life. The course aims to pull all of a student’s education together into a unified whole, preparing them for their new adventures beyond high school in the home, church, college, and society.

 

French I

In French 1, students begin to develop competence in four basic skill areas: listening, speaking, reading, and writing. While developing communicative competence in French, students gain and expand their knowledge of francophone countries and cultures.

Emphasis is placed on learning the present tense, the near future and the past tense in French I through thematically designed units. Topics include home, school, family, holidays, and daily and leisure activities.

 

French II

French II is a high school foreign language course that builds on and reviews skills and concepts taught in French I through further exposure to communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, writing, and cultural competency.

 

General Science III

General Science III is a basic intermediate course intended to expose students to the designs and patterns in God’s physical universe. This course expands on General Science I and II courses. Some of the areas covered in General

Science III include the structure of matter, atomic nuclei and radioactivity, geology, oceanography, astronomy, microbiology, medicine, and science today and in the future.

Students at this level should show development in their ability and understanding of scientific inquiry. Some of the units contain experiments and projects that seek to develop meaning for the student and to engage the student actively. The continued exposure of science concepts and scientific inquiry will serve to improve the student’s skill and understanding.

 

Health Quest

Health Quest is a health science elective course for upper elementary and junior high students. The curriculum introduces students to the concepts of what good health is, why good health is important, and what students should do in order to achieve good health.

 

High School Health

High School Health is a health science elective course that introduces students to what good health is, why good health is important, and what students should do in order to achieve good health.

 

Music Appreciation

The goal of this semester-long course is to provide instruction in basic musical elements, trace the development and growth of classical music, and give students a strong foundation for a greater appreciation of music. Students will examine music in the world around them and discover how they experience music. They'll be introduced to the basic elements and sounds of music and instruments. Students will learn the names and backgrounds of several famous musical composers. Students will also learn how and where classical music began, how it developed over the centuries, and the ways in which music and culture affect each other. Lastly, students will examine the ways modern music has been influenced by classical music.

This course also provides students with lessons in engaged listening. These special lessons allow students to listen and respond to music. A template for how to listen and respond is provided.

 

Music Theory

Music Theory is a semester-length fine arts elective for high school students. The course requires no prior instrumental, vocal, or music theory study. Using the piano keyboard as a visual basis for comprehension, the course materials explore the nature of music, integrating these concepts:

* rhythm and meter

* written music notation

* the structure of various scale types

* interval qualities

* melody and harmony

* the building of chords

* transposition

Throughout the series of assignments, ear training exercises are interspersed with the bones of composition technique, building in students the ability not only to hear and appreciate music, but step-by-step, to create it in written form as well.

This highly interactive course culminates in the students producing original compositions, which while based on standard notation, demonstrate facets of personal expression. As the students’ ability to perform increases in the future, they will better understand music and therefore better demonstrate its intrinsic communication of emotion and ideas.

 

Personal Financial Literacy

Personal Financial Literacy is a semester-length elective designed to help high school students prepare for success in making financial decisions throughout their lives.

Topics in the course address the advantages of making sound financial decisions in both the short and long term, income planning, money management, saving and investing, and consumer rights and responsibilities.

 

Physical Education

Physical Education is a semester-long elective designed for high school students. The course focuses on performance of individual and team sports, with explanations of proper technique, rules of the game, and preparation. Team sports introduced include soccer, basketball, football, baseball, and volleyball. An introduction to fitness, strength, endurance, and nutrition is also included.

Students will have the opportunity to perform each sport on their own time, while keeping a log of activity. The goal is incorporation of activity into their daily lives and the gain of lifelong healthy fitness habits. Throughout the course, students may be asked to answer questions or to reflect on what they’ve read in their notes. The notes are not graded. Rather, they are a way for students to extend their thinking about the lesson content. Students may keep handwritten or typed notes.

 

Physical Fitness

Physical Fitness is a semester-length elective designed for high school students. The course focuses on the health benefits of regular physical activity and of a long term exercise program.

As students work through the course, they will learn about the many aspects of physical fitness, including basic nutrition, the importance of flexibility, cardiovascular health, muscle and strength training, and realistic goal setting. Along the way, students will be required to maintain and submit an activity log in order to measure progress in course exercises, as well as in personal fitness goals.

 

Spanish I

Spanish I is an entry level high school foreign language course that explores the Spanish language through communication, culture, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Spanish, and in cultural competency.

  

Spanish II

Spanish II is a high school foreign language course that builds upon skills and concepts taught in Spanish I, emphasizing communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Spanish, and in cultural competency.

 

Spanish III

Spanish III is a high school foreign language course that builds upon skills and concepts taught in Spanish II, emphasizing communication, cultures, connections, comparisons, and communities.

Course materials are designed to support students as they work to gain a basic proficiency in speaking, listening, reading, and writing Spanish, and in cultural competency.

 

Trigonometry

Trigonometry is a five-unit elective course for high school students who have successfully completed Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II. The materials cover a development of trigonometry from right triangle trigonometry to oblique triangles and the polar plane. Throughout the course, students will develop trigonometric formulas and use them in real-world applications, evaluate trigonometric proofs using complex trigonometric identities and solving trigonometric equations with regard to the unit circle.

 

Twentieth Century American History

Twentieth Century American History is a history elective for high school students interested in examining American history during a century of change, continuity, and conflicts.

Students will examine America's economic, political, governmental, cultural, and technological growing pains during the twentieth century. They will also consider the causes and effects of national and international cooperation, competition, and conflict. This course seeks to help students develop social studies skills and expand their knowledge of history.

 

Vietnam Era

What comes to mind when you think about the Vietnam Era? For many, that period represents a difficult time in U.S. history. It is defined by an unpopular war that claimed the lives of 58,000 Americans and some 3 million Vietnamese. In this course, you'll look at the history of the Vietnam War. The roots of the conflict stretch further back than you might know. You'll examine why the United States got involved in the conflict and why the United States failed to achieve its objectives.

 

Advanced Placement

 

Calculus

AP® Calculus is a full-year, high school credit course that is intended for the student who has successfully mastered a minimum of four high school level mathematics courses that cover analytical and conceptual algebra (with heavy emphasis on functions), coordinate and plane geometry, and trigonometric functions. It is highly recommended that the student successfully complete pre-calculus as a prerequisite. The course primarily focuses on the skills and methods of analyzing graphical behavior of functions, the definition of a derivative as well as applications of derivatives, integration and their relationships with the graphical function.

  

AP® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF THE COLLEGE BOARD®, WHICH WAS NOT INVOLVED IN THE PRODUCTION OF, AND DOES NOT ENDORSE, THIS

PRODUCT.

 

Comparative Government and Politics

Comparative Government and Politics will introduce students to the diverse political environment outside the United States. The course will compare six selected countries with respect to their political structure and policies as well as different challenges within each of those countries. Students will also examine how different governments solve similar problems and then compare the effectiveness of their approach. One resource that should be widely used in this course is the information provided at apcentral.collegeboard.com. This site contains formerly released free response questions (FRQs) as well as overviews and guidelines as you prepare for the final exams of this course. Most helpful will be the Course Description book which also gives the breakdown of the AP® Exam ™.

The textbooks for this course are:

* Drogus, Orvis, Introducing Comparative Politics: Concepts and Case in Context, 3rd edition. Sage,

   CQ Press 2013. This is the primary textbook for the class. The book is arranged in a way that

   integrates concepts and countries. This will allow you to look at concepts and see them applied in

   context.

* Wood, Ethel. AP Comparative Government and Politics: An Essential Coursebook and Study Guide.

   6th edition Woodyard Publications, 2013. This supplemental text will help to strengthen your

   understanding of the countries and assist in preparation for the AP ™ exam.

 

AP® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF THE COLLEGE BOARD®, WHICH WAS NOT INVOLVED IN THE PRODUCTION OF, AND DOES NOT ENDORSE, THIS

PRODUCT.

 

English Language and Composition

This is a college-level course to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Language and Composition exam by engaging in critical reading, writing, and discussion. The stated purpose of the course (from the College Board) is to "emphasize the expository, analytical, and argumentative writing that forms the basis of academic and professional communication." To accomplish this goal, students learn to read texts closely to determine the author's purpose and means of conveying his or her message.

In addition to various passages and articles, students engage in analysis of images to better understand the processes of communication, persuasion and argument. The goal is to develop skills in analyzing, explaining, and arguing through the analysis of texts from various time periods and genres and through writing formal and informal responses to them in a variety of modes. Students will also complete quizzes, timed essays, and practice tests to help prepare for the AP® exam throughout the course.

It is highly recommended that teachers and students alike register with AP® Central to gain access to previously published tests as additional practice.

Course Details

The focus of this course is to prepare students for the AP® Exam, and enable them to complete the kind of writing that the Exam requires. Thus, the central focus is the forty-minute timed test and strategies that will help students to be successful. Students will work on analysis by answering short answer questions. Their responses should be well developed, correctly spelled, and complete.

Students will also become accustomed to the basic structure of the College Board's 9 Point Rubric, as it will be used for scoring all essays in this course.

Due to the complex nature of this course, and the multi-faceted approach to the AP® Exam preparation, most lessons will likely take longer than one traditional class period. Plan for two to three traditional class periods, in order to allow students ample time to complete their work. Each lesson contains specific notes regarding work time, for teacher reference.

 

Human Geography

Course Design: Human Geography is taught as an introductory-level college course intended to prepare students for the Advanced Placement Human Geography exam. This two-semester course will teach students the basic concepts of human geography and give them a geographic framework for the analysis of current world problems through case studies, computer applications, and fieldwork. The students will learn to use the tools of a geographer to ask geographic questions; acquire, organize, and analyze geographic information; and answer geographic questions. They will also take online, multiple-choice quizzes, and practice free-response questions (FRQs) in preparation for the AP® exam.

Applications: Though this course is online, it is very hands-on and inquiry-based. Students will conduct field studies – both virtual and on location – and work with a geographic information system (GIS) and various types of maps, graphs, charts, and other forms of data display and organization to solve geographic problems. They will view geographic videos and utilize online resources to learn more about human geography. They will learn to apply geographic concepts and models to real-life problems by using case studies and activities that require them to apply geographic analysis.

Course Materials: The basic text for the course is Human Geography: Landscapes of Human Activities, by Jerome Fellmann, Mark Bjelland, Arthur Getis, and Judith Getis, 11th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2010. Application activities for each unit will come from Human Geography in Action, by Michael Kuby, John Harner, and Patricia Gober, 6th edition, John

Wiley & Sons, Inc., 2012. Both books must be purchased. The students will need access to map collections, atlases, encyclopedias, and other reference materials both online and in their local libraries.

Online Geography Vocabulary List: The terms geographers use are very important because they form the building blocks for understanding concepts integral to geography. Each chapter of the textbook contains a keywords section at the back of the chapter. Each week, students should add these words and their definitions to a list for review for the exam in the spring. This assignment will not be graded nor receive points. It is a suggestion to help students succeed.

Students should keep a list of ALL the vocabulary words in each chapter in a computer file. They should put the words and the definitions in an Excel spreadsheet so they can be sorted alphabetically as each new chapter’s list of vocabulary is added. This will yield an excellent tool for review as the AP® exam time approaches.

 

Macro Economics

Macro Economics is the study of the performance of an economy as a whole. This course will cover in detail basic economic concepts, measurement of economic performance, national income and price determination, the financial sector, inflation, unemployment and stabilization policies, economic growth and productivity, and international trade and finance. Upon completing this course, students will be trained to interpret economic news, understand the effects of government policies, and excel on the AP® exam. The learning methodologies in this course are varied and highly interactive, and the main textbook will be supplemented with economic simulation games, application reports, assessments, and videos.

 

U.S. Government and Politics

U.S. Government and Politics offers students an advanced study of topics concerning the nation’s founding and form of government, as well as an examination of historical and current political issues. The assignments in this course utilize an assigned textbook and study guide, as well as links to external content and articles.

Below is a list of resources that are not included in this course and must be acquired separately.

* Textbook:

   o Keeping the Republic, 6th edition

* Study Guide:

   o 5 Steps to a 5: AP U.S. Government and Politics

 

AP® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF THE COLLEGE BOARD®, WHICH WAS NOT INVOLVED IN THE PRODUCTION OF, AND DOES NOT ENDORSE, THIS

PRODUCT.

 

U.S. History

U.S. History is an advanced history course that helps students prepare for the College Board’s AP exam. The course emphasizes the movements and events that have shaped the United States from its earliest beginnings to the present day.

Upon completion of the course, students should be able to do the following:

* Describe the political, economic, and religious characteristics of the original colonies.

* Identify the causes and outcomes of the Revolutionary War.

* Describe the Industrial Revolution and its effects on American society.

* Recall the causes and major events of the Civil War.

* Explain the factors influencing U.S. imperialism.

* Summarize U.S. involvement in World War I.

* Describe the economic and cultural characteristics of the Roaring Twenties.

* Describe the Great Depression and the New Deal.

* Outline the contributions of the United States to the Allied victory in World War II.

* Describe the causes and events of the Cold War.

* Describe the social and economic conditions in the United States in the post-World War II period.

 

AP® IS A REGISTERED TRADEMARK OF THE COLLEGE BOARD®, WHICH WAS NOT INVOLVED IN THE PRODUCTION OF, AND DOES NOT ENDORSE, THIS

PRODUCT.